Alcuin - Scholar, Advisor, and Friend to Charlemagne (Annotated) Frederick Lorenz

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Published: February 25th 2011

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153 pages


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Alcuin - Scholar, Advisor, and Friend to Charlemagne (Annotated)  by  Frederick Lorenz

Alcuin - Scholar, Advisor, and Friend to Charlemagne (Annotated) by Frederick Lorenz
February 25th 2011 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 153 pages | ISBN: | 7.47 Mb

- Annotated with suggested further reading and additional web contentAlcuin of York (Latin: Alcuinus) or Ealhwine, nicknamed Albinus or Flaccus (730s or 740s – 19 May 804) was an English scholar, ecclesiastic, poet and teacher from York, Northumbria.More- Annotated with suggested further reading and additional web contentAlcuin of York (Latin: Alcuinus) or Ealhwine, nicknamed Albinus or Flaccus (730s or 740s – 19 May 804) was an English scholar, ecclesiastic, poet and teacher from York, Northumbria.

He was born around 735 and became the student of Archbishop Ecgbert at York. At the invitation of Charlemagne, he became a leading scholar and teacher at the Carolingian court, where he remained a figure in the 780s and 790s. He wrote many theological and dogmatic treatises, as well as a few grammatical works and a number of poems.

He was made Abbot of Saint Martins at Tours in 796, where he remained until his death. He is considered among the most important architects of the Carolingian Renaissance. Among his pupils were many of the dominant intellectuals of the Carolingian era.Alcuins love of the church and his intellectual curiosity allowed him to be reluctantly persuaded to join Charlemagnes court.

He joined an illustrious group of scholars that Charlemagne had gathered around him, the mainsprings of the Carolingian Renaissance: Peter of Pisa, Paulinus of Aquileia, Rado and Abbot Fulrad. Alcuin would later write that the Lord was calling me to the service of King Charles.He was welcomed at the Palace School of Charlemagne in Aachen (Urbs Regale) in 782. It had been founded by the king’s ancestors as a place for the education of the royal children (mostly in manners and the ways of the court). However, Charlemagne wanted to include the liberal arts and, most importantly, the study of the religion that he held sacred.

From 782-790, Alcuin taught Charlemagne himself, his sons Pepin and Louis, the young men sent to be educated at court and the young clerics attached to the palace chapel. Bringing with him from York his assistants Pyttel, Sigewulf and Joseph, Alcuin revolutionized the educational standards of the Palace School, introducing Charlemagne to the liberal arts and creating a personalised atmosphere of scholarship and learning, to the extent that the institution came to be known as the school of Master Albinus.In this role as adviser, he tackled the emperor over his policy of forcing pagans to be baptised on pain of death, arguing, Faith is a free act of the will, not a forced act.

We must appeal to the conscience, not compel it by violence. You can force people to be baptised, but you cannot force them to believe. His arguments seem to have prevailed - Charlemagne abolished the death penalty for paganism in 797.Charlemagne was a master at gathering the best men of every land in his court. He himself became far more than just the king at the centre. It seems that he made many of these men his closest friends and counsellors. They referred to him as David, a reference to the Biblical king David. Alcuin soon found himself on intimate terms with Charlemagne and the other men at court, to whom he gave nicknames to be used for work and play.[citation needed] Alcuin himself was known as Albinus or Flaccus.Alcuin’s friendships also extended to the ladies of the court, especially the queen mother and the kings daughters.

His relationships with these women never reached the intense level of those of the men around him. Modern commentators,have identified the homo-erotic tone of some of Alcuins poetry, emphasising the spiritual and idealistic aspects of his love for his friends and his pupils. While at Aachen, his pupils were given pet names, derived from classical allusions (mainly from Virgils Eclogues).



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